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Graph Basics Get the User Photo and save it to a file (and resize it) with PowerShell

This is part 2 of my Graph Basic's series and this post is born out of an actual need that I had over the last week which was to get a user photo from the Microsoft Graph and save it as a custom size and different image type. Like many things there are multiple ways of doing this but the Microsoft Graph GetPhoto endpoint is pretty straight forward and delivers the image in one of the following formats 48x48, 64x64, 96x96, 120x120, 240x240, 360x360, 432x432, 504x504, and 648x648. Because I wanted to use the photo on a Elgato stream deck this required the size be 72x72 so I needed some extra code to do the resize of the photo and change the format from a jpeg to png.

Getting the user-photo from the Microsoft Graph 

Before you can get the user's photo from Microsoft Graph you need to make sure the application registration you are using has one of the following permissions

User.Read, User.ReadBasic.All, User.Read.All, User.ReadWrite, User.ReadWrite.All

Then after you have obtain the Token make a request to Graph like

https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/users('user@domain.com')/photos/240x240/$value 

The results of this Get Request will be a Jpeg image 240x240 for that user, if you use Invoke-WebRequest you can simply then just use the  -Filename parameter to specify the output filename and that it.

My function to download and resize the user photo looks like


So if you just want the user photo in the native format (which will be jpeg) use

Get-GraphUserPhoto -MailboxName user@domain.com -Filename c:\temp\dnlPhoto.jpeg -PhotoSize 240x240

If you want to get the user photo and resize it (72x72) and save it as a png

Get-GraphUserPhoto -MailboxName user@domain.com -Filename c:\temp\dnlPhoto.png -PhotoSize 240x240 -ReSizeDimension 72 -ReSizeImageForamt Png

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